Hidden treasures

The history of Brigidini from Lamporecchio.

Local Traditions
brigidini-lamporecchio-1

The history of Brigidini from Lamporecchio.

Brigidini…so tasty, who hasn’t heard of them? Their sweet scent pervades the air of any countryside fair or festival. They immediately make us think about party celebrations and of childhood’s delicious flavors. Surely many of you will have tasted them at least once! If this is not the case, you should know that Brigidini are crispy and flaky biscuits, with a diameter of about 7 cm and a golden yellow color. The main ingredients are sugar, eggs and flour but their unmistakable flavor comes from the aroma of anise, the real trademark of this delicacy that Artusi described as ‘a sweet or better a special amusement in Tuscany’.

Now they are produced with special plunger machines that churn out one Brigidino after the other in front of the curious eyes of young and old. But do you know that this delicious sweet was actually born in the 16th century? Its creation and also its name are due to the nuns of a convent in Lamporecchio in the Montalbano area. The Brigidine, as the nuns dedicated to Santa Brigida were known, took care of the production of communion wafers. It is not clear if on purpose, by chance or by mistake, but one day they added to the traditional ingredients of the wafers those typical of Brigidino. At that time there were no plunger machines and everything was done by hand. The dough balls were pressed by ‘schiacce’: iron molds that were pressed against each other and then passed over the fire. This is how Brigidini were born, and from Lamporecchio, their place of origin in the province of Pistoia, they have ventured all over the world in their characteristic narrow and long bags!

Are you curious to discover many other typical delicacies of ancient Tuscan traditions? Join one of ou food and wine tour  and you will surely have the chance to taste many sweet and savory treats watered down with excellent wine!

By Insidecom Editorial Staff

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