Hidden treasures

Curzio Malaparte's Maledetti Toscani

Big Names
Maledetti_Toscani

Curzio Malaparte's Maledetti Toscani

These Tuscans! ‘Maledetti Toscani, as Italians would say. Why, what have they done? It’s actually the title of a book that illustrates in a sharp and candid way the most genuine aspects of the Tuscan spirit. It is definitely not a recent best-seller: it was published in 1956! It was written by Curzio Malaparte, whose real name was Kurt Erich Suckert. Coming from a German father and a Lombard mother, he was born in Prato in 1898 where he studied at the famous Istituto Cicognini. He was an eclectic character who was a jack of all trades: officer, diplomat, journalist, writer, theatrical author and film director. If you really want to understand what Tuscans are like, from which historical and cultural facts their distinctive characteristics come from, this book is right for you.

Curzio Malaparte, with his clear and powerful style, exposes the true nature of Tuscans, their vices and their virtues. Some of the phrases in the book have become famous. At the beginning of the book, for example, he says ‘we’d be better off if in Italy there were more Tuscans and less Italians'. Worded that way it seems quite pretentious, but after all the author was firmly convinced of the superiority of Tuscans over Italians.

'Tuscans have the sky in their eyes and hell in their mouths'. This is certainly one of his most famous and emblematic quotes. What does it mean? It means that the inhabitants of Tuscany have 'beauty always before their eyes'. All you have to do is open a window to find yourself overwhelmed by the beauty of a landscape, an ancient village, a beautiful square, a work of art. But at the same time Tuscans are also famous for their colorful language and for their unforgivable sharp tongue. Let's say that the two things outweigh each other!

What do you think, do you fancy filling your eyes with beauty too? Take a look at our tours in the villages of Tuscany, book one and you’ll have plenty to see! For something language-related, take a look at our anecdotes and fun facts about the idioms and you will find some colorful examples of the sharp Tuscan spirit. Have fun!

By Insidecom Editorial Staff

Latest posts

Siena: The Robin Hood of Radicofani

Ghino_di_Tacco
Historical Curiosities

Albeit not as famous as the one of the Sherwood Forest but nonetheless one of the characters mentioned by Dante in the Divine Comedy, T...

View

Lucca: The smallest theater in the world is near Lucca!

Teatrino_Vetriano
Did you know that...

Do you know where the smallest theater in the world is? According to the Guinness World Records Book you have to go to Vetriano, a smal...

View

Florence: Antonio Magliabechi: a life of books

Antonio_Magliabech
Historical Curiosities

The Central National Library of Florence, in Piazza Cavalleggeri, is one of the most important libraries in Italy with a collection of ...

View

Lucca: The mysterious story of Lucida Mansi

Lucida_Mansi
Mysteries & Legends

The ghost of Lucida Mansi is one of the most famous in Tuscany, so much so that she is one of the main characters wandering around Borg...

View

Top posts

Arezzo: Guido d'Arezzo and the invention of the music

Guido-d-Arezzo
Big Names

In Talla and surroundings people have no doubt: the inventor of the musical stave, the inventor of the music notes and also of the mode...

View

Pistoia: The Kiss of the Christs in Gavinana

Il-bacio-dei-cristi
Local Traditions

It is a very ancient but still popular rite. Two large processions that meet up with a Christ on the cross in front of each one: the he...

View

Siena: Piero Carbonetti and his tin drum

Piero-Carbonetti
Local Traditions

Subversive, persecuted, anarchist, homeless, dreamer: it is really difficult to define Piero Carbonetti, Tuscan bred and born and Garib...

View

Pisa: Kinzika, the young woman who saved Pisa from the Saracens

Kinzika
Local Traditions

It was really her, a young woman with an Arabian name, Kinzica, of the noble Sismondi family, to save Pisa from being sacked by Saracen...

View