Hidden treasures

Caffè Paszkowsky: a beer hall as well as a professional coffee parlor in Florence

Historical Curiosities
Paszkowski

Caffè Paszkowsky: a beer hall as well as a professional coffee parlor in Florence

Can you remember the film ‘Caruso Pascosky of Polish father’ by Francesco Nuti? Although the Italian spelling is slightly different, the Tuscan actor and director may have been inspired for the name of his character by the story of the famous coffee parlor in Piazza della Repubblica, whose owner, Karol Paszkowsky, was Polish.

The cafe, which opened its doors in 1846, was one of the first in Piazza della Repubblica and was initially called ‘Caffè Centrale’. It was only in 1903, when it was acquired by the Paszkowsky company, one of the first in Italy to produce beer, that it became known as the Paszkowsky Café. The name is derived, therefore, from both that of the Polish owner, and the homonymous brand of beer that was served there. In fact, the restaurant in those years became a beer hall: a place to have a drink and food and where singers and musicians performed in the style of a live music cafe.

Today, it is one of the most famous venues in Florence, the perfect place for an aperitif, a cup of tea or a coffee in the very popular outdoor area. In the past it was also an important literary café where people the likes of Prezzolini, D’Annunzio, Soffici, Papini, Montale, Saba and Pratolini and many others met. Since 1991 it has been designated as a national monument, the reason for this you will understand by simply stepping inside it: time seems to have literally stopped, leaving everything exactly as it was in the years gone by.

Well, now that we have told you the story of one of the most important cafés in the city of Florence, how about sitting at one of its tables? Perfect, then go ahead: decide what you'd like to see in Florence and thanks to our private tour Your Own Florence you can put together a guided tour the way you prefer including a nice coffee break at Paszkowsky!

By Insidecom Editorial Staff

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